How to write a hypothesis for science fair projects

Your problem statement and hypothesis are extremely easy to write if you have determined your independent and dependent variables.

How to write a hypothesis for science fair projects

Test Your Hypothesis by Doing an Experiment Analyze Your Data and Draw a Conclusion Communicate Your Results Following the scientific methodwe come up with a question that we want to answer, we do some initial research, and then before we set out to answer the question by performing an experiment and observing what happens, we first clearly identify what we "think" will happen.

We make an "educated guess. We set out to prove or disprove the hypothesis. What you "think" will happen, of course, should be based on your preliminary research and your understanding of the science and scientific principles involved in your proposed experiment or study. Instead, you make an "educated guess" based on what you already know and what you have already learned from your research.

If you keep in mind the format of a well-constructed hypothesis, you should find that writing your hypothesis is not difficult to do.

how to write a hypothesis for science fair projects

If I never water my plant, it will dry out and die. That seems like an obvious statement, right? The above hypothesis is too simplistic for most middle- to upper-grade science projects, however.

As you work on deciding what question you will explore, you should be looking for something for which the answer is not already obvious or already known to you. When you write your hypothesis, it should be based on your "educated guess" not on known data.

Similarly, the hypothesis should be written before you begin your experimental procedures—not after the fact. Hypotheses Tips Our staff scientists offer the following tips for thinking about and writing good hypotheses.

The question comes first. Before you make a hypothesis, you have to clearly identify the question you are interested in studying. A hypothesis is a statement, not a question. Your hypothesis is not the scientific question in your project. The hypothesis is an educated, testable prediction about what will happen.

A good hypothesis is written in clear and simple language. Reading your hypothesis should tell a teacher or judge exactly what you thought was going to happen when you started your project. Keep the variables in mind. A good hypothesis defines the variables in easy-to-measure terms, like who the participants are, what changes during the testing, and what the effect of the changes will be.

For more information about identifying variables, see: Variables in Your Science Fair Project. Make sure your hypothesis is "testable.

You should also be able to repeat your experiment over and over again, if necessary. To create a "testable" hypothesis make sure you have done all of these things: Thought about what experiments you will need to carry out to do the test.

Identified the variables in the project.This is done when one is entering a contest called a science fair or if it is part of an assignment.

Otherwise, a hypothesis can be a good guess. Otherwise, a hypothesis can be a good guess. What is a hypothesis? Every time you read about doing an experiment or starting a science fair project, it always says you need a hypothesis.

How do you write .

Problem Statement and Hypothesis - Science Fair

What is a Hypothesis? A hypothesis is a tentative, testable answer to a scientific question.

Now that you know your independent and dependent variable, the rest of the science fair project is a piece of cake. Your problem statement and hypothesis are extremely easy to write if you have determined your independent and dependent variables. Predictions should include both an independent variable (the factor you change in an experiment) and a dependent variable (the factor you observe or measure in an experiment). A single hypothesis can lead to multiple predictions, but generally, one or two predictions is enough to tackle for a science fair project. In a science fair setting, judges can be just as impressed by projects that start out with a faulty hypothesis; what matters more is whether you understood your science fair project, had a well-controlled experiment, and have ideas about what you would do next to improve your project if you had more time.

Once a scientist has a scientific question she is interested in, the scientist reads up to find out what is already known on the topic.

Then she uses that information to form a tentative answer to her scientific question. An Example of How to Write a Hypothesis. A worker on a fish-farm notices that his trout seem to have more fish lice in the summer, when the water levels are low, and wants to find out why.

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What is a hypothesis?

Search this site: Leave this field blank. For the investigative science project, it is important to have a hypothesis that can be proved or disproved, and one that can be measured.

One way of ensuring that your hypothesis is measurable is to see if you can identify the following variables for your science project. Explore Susan Reed's board "Hypothesis project examples" on Pinterest.

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Write up the experiment and .

science fair project - how to write a hypothesis